Gin Botanicals

Orris Root

Gin Botanical: Orris Root Orris root is the root of certain varieties of iris flower, specifically Iris germanica, Iris florentina, and Iris pallida. Orris: Facts Orris root is used in perfumery in the same way it’s used in gin making – that is, as a base note to bind and stabilise the other aromas. The …

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Orange

Gin Botanical: Orange Oranges; probably the most ubiquitous fruit in the world. Whether as a fruit, juice or flavouring, it gets everywhere. It’s pretty common in gin as well, often alongside lemon. Orange: Facts Oranges mostly come in two varieties; the sweet orange, which is the type we usually eat as fruit, and the bitter …

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Lemon

Gin Botanical: Lemon Culinarily-speaking, everybody knows lemon; be it from lemonade, sorbet, cheesecake, pancakes, or as a simple garnish, it is a very common ingredient. The same is true in gin and most count lemon among their botanical list. It’s not quite as ubiquitous as coriander, but not far off. Personally, the best use I’ve …

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Nutmeg

Gin Botanical: Nutmeg Nutmeg is a distinctly pungent spice that I cook with quite often; it goes in well in cheese sauces and flavours ham when I boil one up. Nutmeg: Facts One of the constituents of nutmeg, Myristicin, is a toxin which can cause hallucinations, nausia, vomiting, tachycardia and a whole host of other …

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Cardamom

Gin Botanical: Cardamom. I love cardamom. I love it in curries, I love it in sweets, I love it in coffee and I love it in gin. Opihr Gin has a huge cardamom-load and I love it. I even made some saffron and cardamom bitters, which I often add to a G&T. Cardamom: Facts. Cardamom …

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Saffron

Gin Botanical: Saffron. Saffron usually graces rice dishes and saffron buns more than it does gin. It has a rich, pungent, distinctive flavour and odour, and gives an intense yellow-orange colour to anything it comes near. My grandmother used to make saffron buns regularly when I was a kid; they were a firm favourite with …

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Cassia

Gin Botanical: Cassia Bark. Cassia is a common gin botanical and is a common ingredient in baking. Cinnamon buns anyone? Cassia: Facts. Cassia bark is a close relation to cinnamon, in that they both dried bark from trees of the genus Cinnamomum. In certain parts of the world, especially the US, cassia is often sold …

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Coriander

Gin Botanical: Coriander Seeds. Coriander seed is the second most popular gin botanical after juniper. Most gins contain it and only a rare few dare to omit it. Coriander: facts There is thought to be a genetic predilection to appreciation of the aroma of coriander. Coriander seed is one of the principle components of generic …

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Angelica Root

Gin Botanical: Angelica Root. Angelica root is one of three common root-botanicals of gin. These are often used as fixatives for lighter, more volatile flavours, stabilising these volatile flavours and helping the different oils to blend. Roots typically add earthy base-notes to the finished gin but they also add sweetness. Roots are usually some of …

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